UA-113443594-1

NASA measured rainfall from Fehi’s remnants in New Zealand

IMAGE: On Jan. 31 at 1725 UTC (Feb. 1 at 6:25 a.m. NZDT) GPM saw rain moving onto the coast of New Zealand's South Island and extremely heavy rainfall in an... view more  Credit: Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite provided a look…

OU astrophysicists discover planets in extragalactic galaxies using microlensing

IMAGE: Image of the gravitational lens RX J1131-1231 galaxy with the lens galaxy at the center and four lensed background quasars. It is estimated that there are trillions of planets in... view more  Credit: University of Oklahoma A University of Oklahoma astrophysics team has discovered for the first time a population of planets beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Using microlensing--an astronomical phenomenon and the only known…

UA space researchers on global team exploring meteors’ impact on...

IMAGE: This is the LUMIO mission profile showing launch, parking, transfer, operative and end-of-life phases. view more  Credit: UA Pink Floyd aside, there isn't actually a dark side of the moon -- just a side you can't see from Earth. That is, unless you're a researcher like those at the University of Arizona and partnering institutions, who are setting out to investigate meteoritic impact on the…

Supermassive black holes can feast on one star per year

CU Boulder researchers have discovered a mechanism that explains the persistence of asymmetrical stellar clusters surrounding supermassive black holes in some galaxies and suggests that during post-galactic merger periods, orbiting stars could be flung into the black hole and destroyed at a rate of one per year. The research, which was recently published in The Astrophysical Journal, also suggests an answer to a longstanding astronomical…

New study challenges popular theory about dwarf galaxies

A new international study involving The Australian National University (ANU) has found a plane of dwarf galaxies orbiting around Centaurus A in a discovery that challenges a popular theory about how dwarf galaxies are spread around the Universe. Co-researcher Associate Professor Helmut Jerjen from ANU said astronomers had previously observed planes of dwarf galaxies whirling around our galaxy, the Milky Way, and the neighbouring Andromeda.…

Business Secretary announces £184 million investment in doctoral training

Business Secretary Greg Clark has today (Thursday 1 February) announced a major investment in science and engineering research totaling £184 million to be allocated over two years. Forty one UK universities will share in the funding that will support doctoral training over a four year period. The Business Secretary made the announcement during a visit to YASA Motors in Oxford where he opened a production…

Surprise: Satellite galaxies of Centaurus A are on a coordinated dance

The satellite dwarf galaxies orbiting around the much larger galaxy Centaurus A are rotating in synchrony around their host, to researchers' surprise. (Researchers expected them to orbit at random). The results contradict simulations based on standard cosmology, which predict that fewer than 1% of satellite systems should exhibit this synchronous behavior. Because our own Milky Way and the neighboring Andromeda Galaxy also have similar arrangements…

Astronomy: A rotating system of satellite galaxies raises questions

IMAGE: Astronomical observations of its satellite galaxies show properties that challenge the conventional cosmological model. view more  Credit: Christian Wolf & SkyMapper Team/Australian National University Astronomers have examined the distribution and movement of dwarf galaxies in the constellation Centaurus, but their observations do not fit with the standard model of cosmology that assumes the existence of dark matter. The international team of researchers led by the…

New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed...

LAWRENCE -- On a ho-hum day some 12,800 years ago, the Earth had emerged from another ice age. Things were warming up, and the glaciers had retreated. Out of nowhere, the sky was lit with fireballs. This was followed by shock waves. Fires rushed across the landscape, and dust clogged the sky, cutting off the sunlight. As the climate rapidly cooled, plants died, food sources…

Interstellar molecules inspire new transformations

Back in the 1930s, astronomers detected one of the first molecules in interstellar space - carbynes. The simplest carbyne, formed by carbon and hydrogen only, is nowadays considered one of the most basic ingredients for life. Despite the impact these molecules could have in synthesis, they had eluded chemists for years. But now, researchers at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) discovered how…
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