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NASA analyzes rainfall and rainmaking capability in Hurricane Sally

NASA satellites provided a look at the rainfall potential in Hurricane Sally before and after it made landfall in southern Alabama. NASA's Aqua satellite and IMERG analysis were used to analyze the storm's flooding potential. Sally came ashore on Wednesday, Sept. 16 around 5:45 a.m. EDT near Gulf Shores, Alabama. It was a Category 2 storm on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind scale with sustained winds…

NASA to Host Preview Briefings, Interviews for First Crew Rotation Mission...

NASA will highlight the first crew rotational flight of a U.S. commercial spacecraft with astronauts to the International Space Station with a trio of news conferences beginning 11 a.m. EDT Tuesday, Sept. 29.

Watch the September 29 Antares Launch from Wallops

Spend a night with friends and family watching the launch of Northrop Grumman’s Antares rocket at 10:27 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, September 29, from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility.

Unraveling a spiral stream of dusty embers from a massive binary...

With almost two decades of mid-infrared (IR) imaging from the largest observatories around the world including the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers was able to capture the spiral motion of newly formed dust streaming from the massive and evolved binary star system Wolf-Rayet (WR) 112. Massive binary star systems, as well as supernova explosions, are regarded as sources of dust in the Universe from…

NASA sees tropical storm Karina’s night moves

IMAGE: NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean during the early morning of Sept. 16 at 3 a.m. PDT/6 a.m. EDT (1000 UTC) and captured a nighttime image... view more  Credit: Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Tropical Storm Karina was making night moves like the old Bob Seger song. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image…

NASA observes Hurricane Sally making early morning landfall in Alabama    

IMAGE: On Sept. 16 at 4:10 a.m. EDT (0810 UTC) NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms within Sally. Aqua found the most powerful thunderstorms were... view more  Credit: Credit: NASA/NRL NASA's Aqua satellite and the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided views of the strength, extent and rainfall potential as Hurricane Sally was making landfall during the morning hours of Sept.…

NASA finds coldest cloud tops on hurricane Teddy’s western side

IMAGE: On Sept. 16 at 12:53 a.m. EDT (0453 UTC) NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Hurricane Teddy's cloud top temperatures using the AIRS instrument. AIRS showed the strongest storms with the coldest... view more  Credit: Credit: NASA JPL/Heidar Thrastarson NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm. Infrared imagery revealed that the strongest storms were on…

NASA-NOAA satellite finds a strengthening tropical storm Noul NASA-NOAA’s Suom

IMAGE: On Sept. 16, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical storm Noul as it continued to strengthen. view more  Credit: Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Noui as it continued to organize…

NASA imagery reveals Paulette became a strong extratropical cyclone 

IMAGE: On Sept. 16 at 10:16 a.m. EDT (1416), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Paulette that showed the storm had transitioned into an extra-tropical... view more  Credit: Credit: NASA/NRL Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low-pressure area. As Hurricane Paulette transitioned into an extra-tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite…

Device could help detect signs of extraterrestrial life

IMAGE: A fully automated microchip electrophoresis analyzer could someday be deployed in the search for life on other worlds. view more  Credit: Adapted from Analytical Chemistry 2020, DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.0c01628 Although Earth is uniquely situated in the solar system to support creatures that call it home, different forms of life could have once existed, or might still exist, on other planets. But finding traces of past or…
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