UA-113443594-1

NASA finds tropical storm Danas northeast of the Philippines

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Danas as it continued to move north and away from the Philippines. On July 17 at 12:40 a.m. EDT (0440 UTC), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible look at Danas. The strongest thunderstorms appeared southeast of the center of circulation in the MODIS image. Danas was…

Speeding up science on near-Earth asteroids

IMAGE: This is an artist's concept of a near-Earth object. view more  Credit: NASA/JPL Modeling the shape and movement of near-Earth asteroids is now up to 25 times faster thanks to new Washington State University research. The WSU scientists improved the software used to track thousands of near-Earth asteroids and comets, which are defined as being within 121 million miles or about 1.3 times the distance…

Red wine’s resveratrol could help Mars explorers stay strong, says Harvard...

Mars is about 9 months from Earth with today's tech, NASA reckons. As the new space race hurtles forward, Harvard researchers are asking: how do we make sure the winners can still stand when they reach the finish line? Published in Frontiers in Physiology, their study shows that resveratrol substantially preserves muscle mass and strength in rats exposed to the wasting effects of simulated Mars…

NASA tracking post-tropical cyclone Barry to Indiana

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the clouds associated with Post-Tropical Cyclone Barry moving through the mid-Mississippi Valley on July 16, and headed toward the Ohio Valley. On July 16, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible look at Barry. Strongest thunderstorms appeared over northwestern Arkansas, western Tennessee and southwestern Kentucky at the time of…

Flying the final approach to Tranquility Base

As the Apollo 11 Lunar Module approached the Moon's surface for the first manned landing, commander Neil Armstrong switched off the autopilot and flew the spacecraft manuallly to a landing. A new video, created at Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration, shows what Armstrong saw out his window as the lander descended -- and you'll see for yourself why he took over…

IceCube: Antarctic neutrino detector to get $37 million upgrade

MADISON, Wis. -- IceCube, the Antarctic neutrino detector that in July of 2018 helped unravel one of the oldest riddles in physics and astronomy -- the origin of high-energy neutrinos and cosmic rays -- is getting an upgrade. This month, the National Science Foundation (NSF) approved $23 million in funding to expand the detector and its scientific capabilities. Seven new strings of optical modules will…

Americans reflect on Apollo 11 and the space program

ANN ARBOR--On the 50th anniversary of the first Apollo landing on the moon, American adults cite the 1969 lunar landing as NASA's most important achievement in its 60-year history. In a national survey conducted by the University of Michigan, 35% of American adults (age 18 or older) mention the first lunar landings as one of the two most important achievements of NASA when asked in…

A new upgrade for the IceCube detector

IMAGE: The sensors detecting neutrinos are attached to the strings lowered into the ice. The upgrade will take place in the Deep Core area. Illustration: IceCube/NSF view more  Credit: IceCube/NSF The IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica is about to get a significant upgrade. This huge detector consists of 5,160 sensors embedded in a 1x1x1 km volume of glacial ice deep beneath the geographic South Pole. The…

Miniature gravitational-wave detector to be built at Northwestern

IMAGE: Infographic depicts the full landscape of gravitational wave-causing events and the sensors capable of detecting them. view more  Credit: Northwestern University A team of physicists and astronomers from Northwestern University is poised to lead gravitational-wave astronomy into its next evolution. The W. M. Keck Foundation has awarded $1 million, which will be used to develop a prototype for a new kind of gravitational-wave detector that…

New measurement of universe’s expansion rate is ‘stuck in the middle’

Pasadena, CA--A team of collaborators from Carnegie and the University of Chicago used red giant stars that were observed by the Hubble Space Telescope to make an entirely new measurement of how fast the universe is expanding, throwing their hats into the ring of a hotly contested debate. Their result--which falls squarely between the two previous, competing values--is published in The Astrophysical Journal. Nearly a…
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