UA-113443594-1

Stars need a partner to spin universe’s brightest explosions

IMAGE: This is an artist's impression of gamma-ray burst with orbiting binary star. view more  Credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick When it comes to the biggest and brightest explosions seen in the Universe, University of Warwick astronomers have found that it takes two stars to make a gamma-ray burst. New research solves the mystery of how stars spin fast enough to create conditions to launch a…

Collision helped make the Milky Way — and now we know...

Thanks to some astrophysical sleuthing, researchers have pinpointed an early galactic merger that helped shape the Milky Way. The merger -- a collision, actually -- happened 11.5 billion years ago. That's when a small galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus slammed into what then existed of the Milky Way, Earth's home galaxy, which is about 13.5 billion years old. "We know today that the Milky Way was formed…

How the solar system got its ‘Great Divide,’ and why it...

Scientists, including those from the University of Colorado Boulder, have finally scaled the solar system's equivalent of the Rocky Mountain range. In a study published today in Nature Astronomy, researchers from the United States and Japan unveil the possible origins of our cosmic neighborhood's "Great Divide." This well-known schism may have separated the solar system just after the sun first formed. The phenomenon is a…

APS tip sheet: High energy gamma rays

IMAGE: Nine Galactic sources are the highest-energy gamma -ray sources ever detected, which could suggest the presence of Galactic accelerators view more  Credit: The HAWC Collaboration New research detects gamma-ray emissions at unusual energy levels (above 56 and even 100 tera electron Volts (TeV)). Scientists with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Collaboration analyzed the galactic emissions by identifying their source, their location, and their spectral…

TESS dates an ancient collision with our galaxy

A single bright star in the constellation of Indus, visible from the southern hemisphere, has revealed new insights on an ancient collision that our galaxy the Milky Way underwent with another smaller galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus early in its history. An international team of scientists led by the University of Birmingham adopted the novel approach of applying the forensic characterisation of a single ancient, bright star…

Meteorite contains the oldest material on Earth: 7-billion-year-old stardust

Stars have life cycles. They're born when bits of dust and gas floating through space find each other and collapse in on each other and heat up. They burn for millions to billions of years, and then they die. When they die, they pitch the particles that formed in their winds out into space, and those bits of stardust eventually form new stars, along with…

Connecting the dots in the sky could shed new light on...

Astrophysicists have come a step closer to understanding the origin of a faint glow of gamma rays covering the night sky. They found that this light is brighter in regions that contain a lot of matter and dimmer where matter is sparser - a correlation that could help them narrow down the properties of exotic astrophysical objects and invisible dark matter. The glow, known as…

Odstrcil receives funding for heliospheric model project

Dusan Odstrcil, Senior Research Scientist, Physics and Astronomy, received $50,000 from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for a project aimed at producing a high-quality heliospheric model. Odstrcil and his collaborators are using Python to produce this imaging that is currently otherwise created using Interactive Data Language (IDL). They anticipate significant acceleration of the visualization process via this method. This step should also make more outputs…

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts Aboard Space Station

Students from Texas will have an opportunity this week to talk with three NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

SuperTIGER on its second prowl — 130,000 feet above Antarctica

IMAGE: The Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (SuperTIGER) instrument is used to study the origin of cosmic rays. SuperTIGER is a collaboration among Washington University in St. Louis, Goddard Space Flight... view more  Credit: Wolfgang Zober, Washington University in St. Louis. A balloon-borne scientific instrument designed to study the origin of cosmic rays is taking its second turn high above the continent of Antarctica three and…
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