UA-113443594-1

NASA’s Fermi traces the history of starlight across cosmos

Scientists using data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have measured all the starlight produced over 90 percent of the universe's history. The analysis, which examines the gamma-ray output of distant galaxies, estimates the formation rate of stars and provides a reference for future missions that will explore the still-murky early days of stellar evolution. "Stars create most of the light we see and synthesize…

Clemson scientists measure all of the starlight ever produced by the...

CLEMSON, South Carolina - From their laboratories on a rocky planet dwarfed by the vastness of space, Clemson University scientists have managed to measure all of the starlight ever produced throughout the history of the observable universe. Astrophysicists believe that our universe, which is about 13.7 billion years old, began forming the first stars when it was a few hundred million years old. Since then,…

What happens when materials take tiny hits

IMAGE: This scanning electron micrograph shows the crater left by the impact of a 10-micrometer particle traveling at more than 1 kilometer per second. Impacts at that speed produce some melting... view more  Credit: Courtesy of the researchers When tiny particles strike a metal surface at high speed -- for example, as coatings being sprayed or as micrometeorites pummeling a space station -- the moment of…

A new way to create Saturn’s radiation belts

IMAGE: This graphic shows the radiation belt around the planet of Saturn. A team of scientists has discovered a new method to create this. view more  Credit: Emma Woodfield @ BAS A team of international scientists from BAS, University of Iowa and GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences has discovered a new method to explain how radiation belts are formed around the planet Saturn. Around Saturn,…

NASA TV to Air Next International Space Station Crew Launch, Docking

Three space travelers, including two astronauts on their first flight, are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Monday, Dec. 3 for a six-and-a-half month mission.

The ‘Chinese Pyramids’ and the pole star

IMAGE: These are the Terracotta Warriors protecting the Qin Mausoleum's east front. view more  Credit: Giulio Magli The funerary complex of the first Chinese emperor of the Qin dynasty (3th century BC) is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. This is of course due to the discovery of the statues of the terracotta army, intended to accompany the emperor in the afterlife.…

Detective mission to characterize and trace the history of a new...

IMAGE: Professors Roger Gibson (left) and Lewis Ashwal (right) discussing their preliminary assessment of the Benenitra meteorite with Tim Marais. view more  Credit: Wits University Researchers from Wits and colleagues from the University of Antananarivo in Madagascar are on a "detective mission" to describe, classify and trace the history of a meteorite that landed in and around the small town of Benenitra in southwestern Madagascar shortly…

Prehistoric cave art reveals ancient use of complex astronomy

IMAGE: Some of the world's oldest cave paintings have revealed how ancient people had relatively advanced knowledge of astronomy. Animal symbols represent star constellations in the night sky, and are used... view more  Credit: Alistair Coombs Some of the world's oldest cave paintings have revealed how ancient people had relatively advanced knowledge of astronomy. The artworks, at sites across Europe, are not simply depictions of wild…

NASA’s GPM shows small area of heavy rain in Tropical Storm...

IMAGE: NASA-JAXA's GPM core observatory satellite provided an analyzation of rainfall within Man-yi on Nov. 26 at 11:41 a.m. EST (1641). Heaviest estimated precipitation was falling at a rate of greater... view more  Credit: Credit: NASA/NRL/JAXA Once a typhoon, Man-yi has weakened to a tropical storm as it continues to track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, far to the east of Taiwan. The GPM core satellite…

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 33W dissipating

IMAGE: At 2:12 a.m. EDT (0712 UTC) on Nov. 26, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone 33W's disorganized remnants dissipating over the Ca Mau Peninsula.... view more  Credit: Credit: NASA/NRL When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Ca Mau Peninsula it captured a visible image of the dissipating former Tropical Cyclone 33W. The Ca Mau Peninsula is the southernmost area…
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