UA-113443594-1

Where are they?

"Are we alone in the universe?" The question has fascinated, tantalized and even disconcerted humans for as long as we can remember. So far, it would seem that intelligent extraterrestrial life -- at least as fits our narrow definition of it -- is nowhere to be found. Theories and assumptions abound as to why we have neither made contact with nor seen evidence of advanced…

NASA satellite analyzes new Southern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone

IMAGE: At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Sept. 27, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Tropical Storm Liua in infrared light. MODIS found two areas of coldest... view more  Credit: NASA/NRL NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at a new storm that formed in the southern Pacific Ocean called Liua and saw strongest storms off-center. At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC)…

Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey reveals detailed dark matter map of the universe

IMAGE: Left panel: The 3-dimensional dark matter map of the universe inferred from one of the six HSC observation areas is shown in the background with various shades of blue (brighter... view more  Credit: HSC project/UTokyo Einstein's general theory of relativity has helped an international team of researchers measure the lumpiness of dark matter in our Universe today by analyzing images of 10 million distant galaxies,…

VLA discovers powerful jet coming from ‘wrong’ kind of star

Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have discovered a fast-moving jet of material propelled outward from a type of neutron star previously thought incapable of launching such a jet. The discovery, the scientists said, requires them to fundamentally revise their ideas about how such jets originate. Neutron stars are superdense objects, the remnants of massive stars that exploded…

Ireland to join the European Southern Observatory

IMAGE: The Irish flag is hoisted for the first time at ESO's Headquarters in Garching bei München, signifying Ireland becoming a Member State of ESO once the ratification process is complete.... view more  Credit: ESO Irish astronomers are set to gain access to the world's most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes following the signature of Ireland's Accession Agreement in Dublin today, 26 September 2018. The signing of…

NASA TV to Air Live Coverage of International Space Station Crew...

Three of the astronauts aboard the International Space Station, including two NASA astronauts, are scheduled to return to Earth on Thursday, Oct. 4.

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP Satellite gets an infrared view of Typhoon Trami

IMAGE: The VIIRS instrument on the Suomi NPP satellite flew over Typhoon Trami at 1724 UTC (1:24 p.m. EDT) on Sept. 25. Cloud top temperatures were near 190 Kelvin/-117.7F/-83.5C around the... view more  Credit: Credit: UWM/SSEC/CIMSS, William Straka III Typhoon Trami looked formidable in infrared imagery taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite as it moves to the southern Islands of Japan. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided…

Both halves of NASA’s Webb Telescope successfully communicate

IMAGE: Technicians send and monitor a series of commands to the James Webb Space Telescope that are designed to mimic how it will function in space. Tests like these help to... view more  Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn For the first time, the two halves of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope -- the spacecraft and the telescope--were connected together using temporary ground wiring that enabled them to "speak"…

The notorious luminous blue variable star

Sparkling with an exceptional blue-toned brilliance and exhibiting wild variations in both brightness and spectrum, the luminous blue variable (LBV) is a relatively rare and still somewhat mysterious type of star. Its appearance tends to fluctuate radically over time, and that has piqued the curiosity of astrophysicists who wonder what processes may be at play. "The luminous blue variable is a supermassive, unstable star," said…

Elusive origin of stellar geysers revealed by 3D simulations

Astrophysicists finally have an explanation for the violent mood swings of some of the biggest, brightest and rarest stars in the universe. The stars, called luminous blue variables, periodically erupt in dazzling outbursts nicknamed "stellar geysers." These powerful eruptions launch entire planets' worth of material into space in a matter of days. The cause of this instability, however, has remained a mystery for decades. Now,…
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